Monday, May 9, 2011

Chow Chow, Carlin Pinscher & Miniature Schnauzer - Kansas City Dog & Pet Photography

What do you get when you combine a Chow Chow puppy, a Miniature Schnauzer and two Carlin Pinschers? Quite the exciting playdate! I have decided to feature each breed below to help others learn more about their characteristics.

*Below information from dogbreedinfo.com*


ABOUT THE CHOW CHOW
The Chow Chow is a large, stocky dog. The two most distinctive features of the Chow Chow are its blue-black tongue and its almost straight hind legs, which makes it walk rather stilted. The head is large and broad with a flat skull.



Temperament
The Chow Chow is a well-mannered dog. Quite good with children. If they get to know cats and other household animals when they are young, they will get along with them when they are adults. Should be thoroughly socialized preferably when they are young. They need firm authority and training starting at puppyhood. This is a very dominant breed who requires a dominant owner. The owner of this breed of dog should be a calm person who is naturally firm, confident, and consistent. With such a handler, the Chow Chow can develop well. The problems arise when the dog lives with owners who do not understand how to be, and stay in the alpha position. If you allow this dog to believe they are the boss of your house they will become stubborn, protective and sometimes down right unruly. Chow Chows who believe they are boss will often be a one-person dog, very loyal to their master, though he may act reserved, even with them. Alpha Chow Chows like to dominate other dogs. A Chow Chow who is not 100% convinced humans are the boss, will be harder to obedience train. When you have a Chow Chow who believes he is the ruler of humans and strangers push themselves on this dog, he may become aggressive, telling the humans he would like to have his space. Space means a lot to a dog. It is respect in the dog world.

Height, Weight
Height: 18-22 inches (46-56 cm.) Weight: 45-70 pounds (20-32 kg.)

Health Problems
They are prone to suffer eye irritation called entropion, caused by eyelid abnormality; this can be corrected with surgery. Also prone to hip dysplasia, stomach cancer, hot spots and ear infections. Because of their relatively short muzzles they often snore.

Exercise
Chow Chows can be lazy, but need to be taken for a daily walk. Dogs who do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display a wide array of behavior problems.

Life Expectancy
About 15 years

Grooming
Regular brushings of the long coat is important to maintain the lifted, standing-out look. This breed is a seasonal heavy shedder and extra care is needed when the dog is shedding its dense undercoat. Dry shampoo when necessary.

Origin
The exact origin of the Chow Chow is unknown, but we do know that it is a very old breed. The oldest known dog fossils, dated back to several million years ago, are very similar in structure to the Chow Chow. Pictures on Chinese pottery which looked like the Chow Chow date back as far back as 206 BC. The Chow Chow may be related to the Chinese Shar-Pei, as both breeds origins point to China and both have the distinctive trait of the black and blue mouth. It may also have contributed to the ancestry of the Keeshond, Samoyed, Norwegian Elkhound, and the Pomeranian. The Chow Chow was used by the Chinese as a working dog doing many different tasks such as a hunter of wolves, sable and pheasant, for herding, cart and sled puller, boat guard, and protection of the home. The dogs served the Chinese much more then just as a working dog.

ABOUT THE CARLIN PINSCHER
For a developing breed, Carlin Pinschers are very similar in appearance. The Carlin Pinscher has no breathing problems due to the fact that they have some of the Miniature Pinscher's muzzle. The Pug has given them thicker legs and a stronger looking body. The coat is the same as the shorter, almost non-shedding coat of the Miniature Pinscher. The color that it is being bred for is black and tan.



Temperament
According to Isabeau, one of the Carlin Pinscher's original developers, "they are patient and pleasant like a Pug," although they still retain some, but not all of the Miniature Pinscher's terrier like behaviors. This is an even-tempered breed, exhibiting stability, playfulness, great charm, dignity, and an outgoing, loving disposition. Most puppies, raised with respectful children who know how to show the dog leadership, grow into respectful, gentle dogs. Obedience training and a firm pack leader is a must for all dogs, as an ill-behaved dog is more likely to harm a child due to lack of leadership. Make sure you are this dog's firm, confident, consistent pack leader to avoid Small Dog Syndrome, human induced behavior problems. Always remember, dogs are canines, not humans. Be sure to meet their natural instincts as animals.

Height, Weight
Height: 11 to 13 inches (28-33 cm.) Weight: 12 to 14 pounds (5-6 kg.)

Exercise
These dogs do not require a lot of exercise but should be walked daily to fulfill their primal canine instinct to walk. In addition, they should be given regular opportunities to run and play. Make sure any yard in which they can run loose has
a fence high enough to prevent their determined efforts to escape and explore.

Life Expectancy
About 15 or more years.

Grooming
The Carlin Pinscher's smooth, short-haired, hard coat is easy to groom. Comb and brush with a firm bristle brush, and shampoo only when necessary. Loose hair can be remove by wiping over with a warm, damp washcloth. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin
Originally called the Pug-Pin, this breed began as a cross between the Miniature Pinscher and the Pug. Other breeds, thought to contribute to Carlin Pinscher type, have been, and are being introduced to the gene pool as well. The name Carlin comes from the Pug, as in some countries the Pug is known as the Carlin.

ABOUT THE MINIATURE SCHNAUZER
The Miniature Schnauzer is a small, sturdily built, little dog. The body is square in proportion. The strong head is rectangular in shape. The width of the head gets slightly smaller from the years to the eyes. The muzzle is strong and ends rather bluntly. The nose is black. The bite is scissors. The deep-set, small eyes are dark brown in color. Ears set high on the head are often cropped to a point. The Mini Schnauzer has a double coat. The outer coat is wiry and the undercoat is soft. The coat is clipped so it has a bushy beard, mustache and eyebrows.


Temperament
The Miniature Schnauzer is an intelligent, loving, happy dog. They are energetic, playful and get along well with children and like to be with their people. Affectionate, keen, devoted and docile. With proper leadership they can get along with other dogs. Socialize this breed well. They make good companions and family pets. The Mini Schnauzer will not listen if they sense they are stronger minded than their owner. Owners need to be calm, but firm, possessing a natural air of authority. They do not have a yappy bark, but rather sounds like a low, carried-out howl of a voice. This breed makes a good watchdog and vermin hunter. An easy dog to travel with. Some can be reserved with strangers if the humans do not provide stability in their lives, but most love everyone. Socialize them well.

Height, Weight
Height: 12-14 inches (30-36cm.) Weight: 10-15 pounds (5-7kg)

Health Problems
Prone to liver disease, kidney stones, diabetes, skin disorders, von Willebrand's disease and cysts. Also hereditary eye problems. Gains weight easily, do not over feed.

Exercise
These energetic little dogs need daily, long, brisk, walks or jogs, and love play sessions off the leash. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Dogs who do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans.

Life Expectancy
About 15 years. It shows no signs of age until quite late in life.

Grooming
The wiry coat is not hard to groom, although it does need attention. Comb and brush daily with a short wire brush to prevent matting. If any appear they should be cut out. They should be clipped all over to an even length twice a year, in spring and fall. Trim around the eyes and ears with blunt-nosed scissors and clean the whiskers after meals. On pet dogs the coat is usually clipped short on the upper body and left somewhat longer on the under-parts, legs and head. Show dogs need to be hand stripped and trimmed instead of clipping. This breed sheds little to no hair and is a good dog for allergy sufferers.

Origin
The Miniature Schnauzer is a German breed. During the years around the turn of the century, both smooth German Pinscher and coarse-haired Schnauzer pups appeared in the same litters. The German Pinscher Schnauzer Club initiated a policy requiring proof of three generations of pure coarse-haired Schnauzer coats for registration.

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.